Mac Moore M.D. | Orthopedic Surgeon in Oklahoma City

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Femoroacetabular Impingement

Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a condition where the bones of the hip are abnormally shaped. Because they do not fit together perfectly, the hip bones rub against each other and cause damage to the joint. The hip is a ball-and-socket joint. The socket is formed by the acetabulum, which is part of the large pelvis bone. The ball is the femoral head, which is the upper end of the femur (thighbone).

A slippery tissue called articular cartilage covers the surface of the ball and the socket. It creates a smooth, low friction surface that helps the bones glide easily across each other. The acetabulum is ringed by strong fibrocartilage called the labrum. The labrum forms a gasket around the socket, creating a tight seal and helping to provide stability to the joint.
In FAI, bone spurs develop around the femoral head and/or along the acetabulum.

The bone overgrowth causes the hip bones to hit against each other, rather than to move smoothly. Over time, this can result in the tearing of the labrum and breakdown of articular cartilage (osteoarthritis).

Types of Femoroacetabular Impingement

  • Pincer – This type of impingement occurs because extra bone extends out over the normal rim of the acetabulum. The labrum can be crushed under the prominent rim of the acetabulum.
  • Cam – In cam impingement the femoral head is not round and cannot rotate smoothly inside the acetabulum.  A bump forms on the edge of the femoral head that grinds the cartilage inside the acetabulum.
  • Combined – Combined impingement just means that both the pincer and cam types are present.
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